Posted in Buddhist Culture, Buddhist Health and Wellness, Chinese culture, Conflicts in Buddhist Life, On the Path, Precepts Holders, Sangha Relationships

Monastics and their adult children talk

Sometimes it’s harder when you are a monastic with your own adult children. Today, I engaged my daughter in what I thought was support when she faced a disappointment. She didn’t want to tell me fearing I would scold but I didn’t so she did herself about herself! So I tried to stop her, then she after calming down decided I was right. I said you know we Buddhists recite things 3 times and in the hopes we remember it once. Then she said maybe she could take up some training. I replied you already had lots of training in my tonsure temple, can you see now how to use what you really know? She said yes she could! And really… this type of conversation was much better than when she was younger and defensive with guilt or imagining what her mom would say (mom is really fair minded… but kid didn’t accept me that way!) She would have bitten my head off for hour or so and been angry for a long time after! Now we just ended a nice talk and she got a better understanding from herself about herself and has not undertaken the mental beating she used too on her own self. Yayyaay! I feel much more like a good monastic and a good mom too boot!!!

It’s really been fun to have been a part of raising her.  She is the first person I really got feedback from all through her life that really improved how I communicated to others!  What a treasure! I am so looking forward to her adult years and yes, she probably won’t be around me much and that’s ok! I have lots of friends to meet and when she feels she has time and resources we will get together and visit as often as she would like to!

I am so glad I had her and very happy she can stand being around me as long as she has! 😛

I am so proud of her, you know I became a nun only after her permission was given. And what was better she was able to visit me and travel back and forth to see me as I progressed in my tonsure training and watched me as monastic grow in my robes over these years.  What a treasure, I am so glad I did not cut her off from me like others have done to their families and some who had kids.  I decided early on for her sake and my families that I would not go to a place to live that would demand such service to their membership at the expense of my own family or country people.  I feel it’s so important to stay in the context of our Western culture and be tolerant of our unique mix of countries and lifestyles.  And that means still living in purity and keeping Vinaya precepts and our foundation received during our tonsure training.  It has been rewarding to see my daughter change herself without even being Buddhist (she says she is not decided about anything yet religious which is fine, as Buddhists we do not convert just teach when asked and in context of the situation we are in.  Okay! Done for now.  Need to sew and repair robes and the pile of hand sewing is too big so need to get on it too.

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Suicide by Sangha please stop

Suicide by Sangha please stop

Suicide by Sangha is not to be promoted. It sickens the heart to keep reading about this misguided effort at attracting world response by some within Tibet. It will not attract a Western response no matter if it continues to escalate or stop. Conflicts that involve suicide as politics never caught on in the West and always are viewed as a social weakness. It generates doubt in the minds of the West as the mental state of minds of some in the Tibetan Sangha. It will create doubt about the Triple Jewel and its efficacy in addressing social imbalances and mental health of people in great need of mental health services and proper Sangha guidance.
Recent self-immolation by monks and nuns and over the years has not brought freedom to Tibet as those in the conflict places have wished. It’s has caused one child to kill herself in copying the monks and nuns already dead from suicide. That is grievous Karma. You should not allow this to continue. Monks and nuns are left-home people and are not to serve as political lessons to the populace no matter how noble the cause. It is a parajika to kill and encourage others to kill human beings.
Self-immolation came to Tibetan monks from outside sources; it’s a relatively new phenomenon. The karma attached to the people who introduced that to a society that has a strong aversion to suicide is enormous. It has opened the door to the desperate and later will escalate to the imbalanced in the population as ‘way out’.
You see a child in middle school has followed some of your misguided Sangha members into death by suicide, a painful way to die. We feel for her grieving family. This is dangerous precedent to make for impressionable children who should be focused on gaining life skills, education and just being kids.
Do something! Address the mental health issues right now. Get training in mental health services so the needy members of the Sangha can be treated and then offer training to the public to serve their areas as well. Treasure the Triple Jewel rather than allow it to be destroyed by your own lack of action.
The majority of Sangha in Tibet supports their vows and upholds the Triple Jewel as well as the majority of Tibetans. No doubt it’s a small number of people promoting this practice; please help end the practice of suicide before it creates an escalated response from increased copycat suicides and unnecessary punitive responses by the government.
Out of great compassion we ask you to please get on with it and increase your skills in offering more productive solutions to troubled communities immediately. Namo Amitabha Buddha!

Posted in Buddhist Culture, Chan - authentic Masters words, Chinese culture, Dharma Talks, Mahayana culture, On the Path, Precepts Holders, Sangha Relationships, Vinaya

Abbot, Bhikshu Ven. Hui Guang clear explaination of Chan transmission, lineage, ordination for monastics

Ven.Da Mo

His Facebook photo set has his photos during his retreat time, he is the present abbot of IBS in Taiwan. He has given us the clearest explanation I have ever seen regarding details of how this process of transmission really works.  It’s important to really get the correct teachings and from the correct teachers.  In the USA we are woefully deluded by the newness of Buddhism, over-reaching for levels or attainments that we do not need or deserve. I am quoting his exact post that appears on the Facebook link.  Let me know if it does not work. I only cut and pasted and hope for the best, I’m new to the blog world here.

https://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/media/set/?set=a.182828165075325.43405.100000444276511

於2008年,我蒙 本換老和尚慈悲親自傳授,禪門正法眼藏,臨濟正宗法脈。此法法脈源流源自於釋迦牟尼佛,祖祖印心相傳,直到近代虛雲老和尚→本煥老和尚→慧光 (第45代臨濟正宗傳人)。
2008, I received the transmission of the Treasury of the True Dharma Eye in the Noble Linji Ch’an Dharma Lineage with the compassion of my  Master, Ch’an Master Ben Huan. This lineage of Dharma transmission trace all the way back to Sakyamuni Buddha. The ancient Masters have transmitted one after another until recent era to Ch’an Master Hsu Yun. Then the Dharma transmission is from: Venerable Master Hsu Yun→ Venerable Master Ben Huan→ Hueiguang (45th generation lineage holder of the Linji Ch’an).

佛教傳承有三種體系:

(一)剃度系——即初出家時,依剃度師之宗派,給予法號(或稱外號),終生稱呼;
(二)授戒系——即求授三壇大戒時所依之三師七尊為壇上得戒十師,按傳統又會給一個法名(或稱戒名、內號,唯有師父能叫),這為戒的傳承法名。
(三)傳法系——即稟承釋迦世尊歷代相傳之正法眼藏,亦即心心相應,教外別傳之系統。此時又會在給一個法名,這為法的傳承法名。一般得法者,則此後只運用此法名。寫名字時應先寫法名,再寫法號。例如我法名為「常安慧光」。「常安」是我得法法名,而「慧光」則是剃度法號。

這種法派,應該代代相傳,不可斷絕。此體系在習慣上,稱為剃度恩師,得戒本師,傳法尊師。中國佛教傳統上,出家是一回事,受戒是一回事,傳法又是一回事,並非一定都由同一位師父主持。又禪宗重在傳法,得法的人, 即稱為法子。當然在家也可得法,但畢竟是少數。出家得法的,多是已在別的師父那裡剃度及受戒。

In Chinese Buddhist tradition, there are 3 systems of transmission:

1. Tonsure system: a person become tonsured as a novice monastic under the Master’s school. He/she is given a Dharma name 法號 at the time of tonsure based on the Master’s lineage. This name is also called “the outer name 外號” because it is use by all people to address you. This name is used for life.

2. Ordination system: a novice will become fully ordained as a Bhikṣu monk/ Bhikṣuni nun with the Triple Platform Ordination (Observing the Śrāmanera, Bhikṣu and Bodhisattva precepts) . This ordination must be presided by 10 monks with at least 10 years of seniority with a pure practice in upholding the monastic precepts. In this ceremony, the 10 Masters represent the Triple Gem accepting the novice into the Sangha. At this time, another Dharma name 法名 is given. This name is also called “precept name 戒名 or inner name 內號” because it is use only by one’s Master. This name represents your precept lineage transmission.

3. Dharma transmission system: This system upholds the Treasury of the True Dharma Eye through the generations of transmission. This is the Mind to Mind seal of the Dharma that is beyond the scriptures. At this time, another Dharma name 法名 is given. This is also called “the inner name 內號” and use only by one’s Master. This name represents your Dharma lineage transmission. After receiving this name, one will use this name instead of the name received during precept ordination to write one’s Dharma name (Inner Name)(Outer Name). For example, my Dharma name is “Chang An Huei Guang 常安慧光”, where “Huei Guang” is my name given at tonsure and “Chang An” is given at Dharma transmission.

Therefore, these systems of transmission should not be ended.
It is customary to refer to one’s own tonsure Master as “Gracious Master”, precept Master as “Root Master” and Dharma transmission Master as “Venerable Master.” In Chinese Buddhism, these 3 systems are separate and are not performed by the same Masters. Moreover, due to the strong emphasis on the Dharma, when a person receives the Dharma transmission, he/she is recognized as that Ch’an Master’s Dharma son/daughter. Of course lay Buddhists may also receive this Dharma transmission, but there are very few incidences. Most of the monk/nun who received the transmission has already been tonsured and ordained by other Masters.

Posted in Buddhism, Buddhist community activities, Buddhist Culture, Buddhist Health and Wellness, Chinese culture, Conflicts in Buddhist Life, Mahayana culture, On the Path, Precepts Holders, Sangha Relationships, Theravada culture, Vinaya

Ex-Buddhists who ate bitterness with Sangha come back

I’ve jsut read another sad story from another Sangha member’s blog, a woman reply with bitterness over her disaster with her guru in Vajrayana. I just replied to her reply.  She was holding on to so much idignation, bitterness and was rejecting women’s roles, robes, and validitiy of Sangha at all.

Abused by her guru and his supporters finally she left. But had to endure hardships and kept biting that bitter nut of regret, rage and grief at her self and the guru.  Until she faces all the habits that kept her there and choices she made to not act for her own safety and hold him accountable she will not progess as rapidity as she would like.  Good therapy, resuming practice with a calmer, harmonious and peaceful Sangha community will help her.

Her failure to undestand her own power as a Buddhist practitioner and the system she was in led to this rotton situation.  It’s common for westerners and some easterners too;  to bitch at us or about us Sangha as being weak, as some of us for being women,  childlike, undeducated, dancing about with our wiles and without power or a sense of our empowerment as Sangha, or accusing us of not policing our Sangha leaders enough so abuses do not even arise at all.

Well in the West Buddhism is not controlled by the government. We do have laws that protect us and Sangha are not above the law.  We are mandated by our Vinaya to observe the laws and respect the government of the country in which we reside.

New Buddhist are just plain ignorant, often tossing their self-control, common sense, sense of right and wrong, memory of whose country they live in anyway, deluded greately by who is in control of them, have definite problems listening to their teachers advice, often fickle to Buddhist practice omiting key traditional practics cuz they don’t wanna, and toss whats left of their minds up in the air as far as they can forcing it all way up until by chance and gravity it is falling into the hands of frauds, politikers, and often well-meaning but really inexperienced with the Western ideas of teachers, saints, leaders and monastics are those small but sincere groups of foreign monks and nuns.  What a hideaous act!

If people when they approach Sangha wanting to learn would keep their heads, stop tossing their minds out for someone else to grab they would get along just fine and make progress they deserve.  It’s gone wrong for many idealistic or perhaps those that reject too much, or make that pick and choose style of Buddhist salada bar type who can’t settle into a practice or goes mental after sitting for days in meditation ‘cuz they heard Buddha Sakyamuni did so.  All of these types often reject Buddhism after trying to capture their minds again from bad practices they kept doing to themselves. Instead of moving on, correcting their mistake they blame.  So in the future they get to repeat the same pattern.

Here is is, what you did wrong perhaps.

The first action of all of these who suffer bitternness is to reject the sangha, temple or center entirely as too far, too much, can’t be bothered to get there, can’t understand them or they won’t undestand me.

2. pick up a book by a famous monk, nun or writer that starts everytime with a warning… do not undertake this practice without supevision of a master, a qualified teacher of the method being taught in this book….. then ignore it, undertake the practice on your own; get mental, get vulnerable, and can’t make the voices stop; can’t work, can’t ….can’t life stops and nothing is the same anymore. So they blame robes, centers, and of course Sangha.

3. have all the answers and sits for hours. at first ok, then for a year or so gets sensations, loves it. keeps going, gets to hear voices.  oh ! progress.  does continue ‘cuz the mind says to. Then oops no job ‘cuz all I wanna do is sit in blisss…yeah that’s the life.  Oops lost the family.   Ooops feel bad voices won’t stop.  Oh no! It’s still progress tho’. Nope I just don’t need sangha! I made it! Numerous visits to psych wards, lots of needed medications, now it’s really all Sangha’s fault!

4. Drugs the faulty test of bliss! It’s so real, vibrant, love to get high during chanting services. I made it! jhana aaaah! I’m expert I can teach this! Wow! fast track to Nirvana! Whoa, the man why he here! Oh, yeah.  Mutiple hospitalizations with freaky side effects. Blames Sangha for lack of progress.

5. Sex is bliss. perhaps you were empowered by your own sexuality or repressed. You know you.  Letting the leader touch you, that was fun or not. People said its a merit/better method/fast way to bliss what ever that is to be with him, a lie and you knew it but were swayed because they knew more than you or insisted you be in the bed with him. he cries to you, he shares intimate fears or worries with you. he clings to you. your hooked. well. if your not then your caught. Right.  But it gets bad, you want out but how? Still want that bliss? Yes so hopeful and  you stay. Then leave badly. Right time to blame Sangha. Despise us, why, why, why?  Why indeed did you not call the cops, consult lawyers, family or friends or leave?

6. Use Buddhism for medical care or mental health care. This is just wrong. It is not meant for this type of approach. The Buddha was not a doctor but sometimes referred to metaphorically as a healer. This is all that meant.  All of Buddhist practice is for well people to undertake.  There is some truth of some practices benefitting some conditions but not any of the modern definitions of serious psychiatric conditions.  I add this to make sure you get it;  IT WAS NOT MEANT FOR PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS, none of it.  No matter how fancy of a pracice offered or by whom.

We live in times of adequate medical care and good therapists and much of Buddhist practice today as in the past is to be undertaken by well people. Mental health issues need to be faced properly and correctly. Most of what people can do for themselves is to do the best they can and not over reach for what they are not ready for or capable of.  Be Real about your issues and you will be more stable!  That is why the Buddha taught us to teach others according to their conditions and capability.  There is no generic Buddhist method to cure or eliminate disease beyond the knowledge of standard science and medicine. Buddhist measure their progress one by one; step by step; not by Proctor & Gamble mass produced pills or B & N books, etc.

At the core of this faulty mindset is this –  the lack of valuation or understanding of the the Triple Jewel.

There is a marked lack of attempt to join  and/or reject a real strong Buddhist community of laity that activly seeks out Sangha to improve their personal practice. And a total lack of common sense and deliberate refusal to put self-preservation first in the face of co-ercive or dangerous practices for what ever unerlying problems you already had coming into your efforts to practice some of the methods of Buddhist practice.

There is no sense of community in the above approaches, this faulty thinking has led many to disaster and ruined many a struggling community. However, all that being said just stop the blame.

Buddha taught us that our minds are our responsibility, it is ours after all and nobody elses.  We are responsible for walking on the path ourselves, not Buddha and not anyone else.

Embrace all of traditional Buddhist practices for they are already time tested with many checks and balances to help you progress.  Being a lone wolf type as many try to do simply does not work.

Sangha monastics know this, they work as a community and train together, they have moments to practice or study what interests them but really that’s only moments daily we are busy with our duties and meeting the community as a whole needs. The strength of our practice lies in our precepts, guided by the Vinaya, striving to study and learn as much Buddha dharma as we can staying withing our basic practices, renewing our selves in retrains, seeking elders in our community and outside our temples for improved understanding and our basic training forming our foundatin while with our tonsure master before we are accepted for full ordiantion.

Sangha are human beings, with all their skills and are still learning and still practicing. We are ahead of you on the path but not there yet to the final goal of enlightenment.  We are entitled to our flaws the same as you. However, we have guidelines that help us daily that’s called monastic discipline or the Vinaya.

Traditionally you are supposed to seek out the Sangha for dharma teaching. If you do not do this you will not make progress on the path yourself.  Sangha, me and others have learned a thing or two being left-home persons and if we  or I am skilled enough in communnications and I or others decide to agree to teach you upon your request then we can share what we know the best we can.

This key action on your part is what you need to do to be safe, to know what is exactly going on in practices and what is normal for Buddhists to do.  Please don’t give up on yourselves and throw your minds away like this it brings more suffering to you, your family mostly and to the sangha.

Have patience for Buddhists really gotta practice daily in order to progress. What makes generational traditional Buddhists miles ahead of you is just that, patience …  facing reality as it is, reading sutras/suttas; charitable acitons for the needy, doing their best to keep a sense of community with other Buddhists and seeking Sangha for more dharma teachings and counseling if they think of it, learning solid safe methods to improve their practices in a supportive environment that is safe for them to be in while studying.

Part two of this will give you real good examples of what lay people say to sangha and what the sangha respond to; appropriate teachings and laity guiding the Sangha in situations and conduct.

Posted in On the Path, Precepts Holders, Vinaya

Common Sangha titles part 2 – use what we tell you

Venerable

In Buddhism, the Western style of Venerable (also abbreviated as Ven.) is entitled to ordained  Buddhist monks  and  nuns  and also to novices ( shramaneras ). The title of Master may be followed for senior members of the  Sangha . Venerable, along with “” Reverend “” (Rev.) is used as a western alternative to Maha Thera in the  Theravada  branch and Shì (釋, as in “Sakya”) in  Chinese  Mahayana  branch.

法師 fashi is the most common form among the Chinese Buddhist community.  It means Dharma Master, and is used for all ranks of monastics from sramaneras to bhikshus and bhikshuni; this is not a term for married clergy as in the laity or for non-Buddhists.

Source: A.P. Buddhadatta Mahathera, Concise Pali-English and English-Pali Dictionary [available as digital version from Metta Net, Sri Lanka]

Description:

venerable : (adj.) mahanīya; garukātabba; sambhāvanīya; gāravāraha.

Source: Buddhistdoor

Description:

喇嘛A transcription of the Tibetan bla ma, usually rendered in English as lama. A Buddhist priest of the Tibetan tradition. The Through Tibetan cultural influence, the terms is also seen used in Mongolia, Nepal, Northeast India, Bhutan, etc.

Source: A.P. Buddhadatta Mahathera, Concise Pali-English and English-Pali Dictionary [available as digital version from Metta Net, Sri Lanka]

Description:

Lama:(m.) Tibbatīya-yati.

Wikipedia source:

Lama  ( Tibetan : བླ་མ་;  Wylie : bla-ma; “chief” or “high priest”) is a title for a  Tibetan  teacher of the  Dharma . The name is similar to the Sanskrit term guru    (see  Tibetan Buddhism  and  Bön ).

Historically, the term was used for venerated spiritual masters  or heads of monasteries.  Today the title can be used as an honorific title conferred on a  monk ,  nun or (in the  Nyingma ,  Kagyu  and  Sakya  schools) advanced  tantric  practitioner to designate a level of spiritual attainment and authority to teach, or may be part of a title such as Dalai Lama  or  Panchen Lama applied to a lineage of reincarnate lamas ( Tulkus ).  Perhaps due to misunderstandings by early western scholars attempting to understand Tibetan Buddhism, the term Lama has historically been erroneously applied to Tibetan monks generally. Similarly, Tibetan Buddhism was referred to as Lamaism by early western scholars and travelers who perhaps did not understand that what they were witnessing was a form of Buddhism; they may also have been unaware of the distinction between Tibetan Buddhism and  Bön . The term Lamaism is now considered by some to be derogatory.

In the  Vajrayana  practice path of Tibetan Buddhism, the lama is often the tantric spiritual guide, the  guru  to the aspiring Buddhist  yogi  or  yogini . As such, the lama will then appear as one of the  Three Roots  (a variant of the  Three Jewels ), alongside the  yidam  and protector (who may be a  dakini ,  dharmapala  or other Buddhist deity figure).

Rinpoche

Source: A Dictionary of Buddhism, Oxford University Press, 2003, 2004 (which is available in electronic version from answer.com)

Description:

rinpoche

A Tibetan title of respect usually reserved for tülkus. The term means ‘precious guru’.

Roshi

Rōshi  (老師 ? ) (Chinese  pinyin : Lǎoshī; Sanskrit : ṛṣi ) is a  Japanese  non-official honorific title used in  Zen Buddhism  that literally means “old teacher” or “elder master” and sometimes denotes a person who gives spiritual guidance to a Zen sangha or congregation. Traditionally, it was applied as a respectful honorific to an older (usually over 60) Zen teacher who was perceived by a sangha to have realized a superior understanding of the  Dharma . Despite this, it has come in some modern Zen schools to be applied as a semi-official title that doesn’t have to do with the age of the individual who receives it. This is especially true in the United States. There is sometimes dispute about use of the term rōshi, and there is wide variance in its application.

Most teachers called rōshi have undergone many years of arduous training. In some  Rinzai  organizations, a monastic is sometimes called rōshi after they have received inka  shōmei, meaning they have completed kōan study and received  Dharma transmission  from their master (full authorization to teach and pass on the lineage). In the  Harada-Yasutani  school, a lay organization that combines Soto and Rinzai elements, a person is called rōshi when they have received inka, indicating they have passed the kōan curriculum and received Dharma transmission.

In the  Sōtō  organization, a person is sometimes called rōshi after they have received the title of shike, but this is by no means standard practice.

Many Zen communities in the  United States  confer the title of rōshi to their teachers in deference to perceived Japanese Zen tradition, and in most instances it is used synonymously with the term  Zen master . However, in Japanese tradition the term’s usage has never been standardized. Its use in this way in the U.S. and Europe has at times led to confusion and controversy.

Chinese  Chán Buddhism  uses the semantically related title sifu (師父, literally “master father” or “father of masters”, or 師傅, literally “master teacher” or “teacher of masters”; both pronounced “shīfu”) as an honorific title for the highest masters, but it also may be used in respectful address of monks and nuns generally.

Stuart Lachs has argued that Zen institutions in the West have often attributed a mythic status to the title rōshi with harmful consequences.

Thera

Source: Dictionary of Pali Proper Names, G P Malalasekera (1899-1973), which is available as printed version from

Description:

Thera.-Name of a monk in Rājagaha. He lived in solitude, the virtues of which state he extolled. Hearing this, the Buddha sent for him and taught him how the solitary life could be perfected in detail (S.ii.282f).

Source: A Dictionary of Buddhism, Oxford University Press, 2003, 2004 (which is available in electronic version from answer.com)

Description: thera

Pāli honorific term meaning ‘old’ or ‘venerable’, and used with reference to the senior monks of the Buddhist monastic order (Saṃgha). The seniority of a monk is determined not by age but by the time elapsed since ordination. Normally ten years’ standing is required for a monk to be considered as a thera.

Source: A.P. Buddhadatta Mahathera, Concise Pali-English and English-Pali Dictionary [available as digital version from Metta Net, Sri Lanka]

Description: thera : [m.] an elder; a senior; a monk who has spent 10 years from his upasampadā. adj. old; elder.

Source: Pali-English Dictionary, TW Rhys Davids, William Stede,

Description:

Thera [Vedic sthavira. Derivation uncertain. It may come from sthā in sense of standing over, lasting (one year or more), cp. thāvara old age, then “old=venerable”; (in meaning to be compared w. Lat. senior, etc. from num. sem “one”=one year old, i. e. lasting over one and many more years). Cp. also vetus=Gr. e)/tos, year, E. wether, one year old ram, as cpd. w. veteran, old man. Or it may come from sthā in der. *stheṷā in sthūra (sthūla: see etym. under thūla) thus, “strong= venerable”] t.t. only used with ref. to the bhikkhus of Gotama Buddha’s community. — (a) (adj.) senior, Vin i.47, 290 (th. bhikkhū opp. navā bh.), 159 (th. bhikkhu a senior bh. opp. to navaka bh. a novice), 187; ii.16, 212. Therânutherā bhikkhū seniors & those next to them in age dating not from birth, but from admission to the Order). Three grades are distinguished, thera bh., majjhima bh., nava bh., at D i.78. — See also A ii.23, 147, 168; v.201, 348; D iii.123 sq., 218; Dh 260, 261. In Sangha — thera, used of Bhikkhus not senior in the Order, the word thera means distinguished. Vin ii.212, 303. In Mahāthera the meaning, as applied to the 80 bhikkhus so called, must also have some similar meaning Dīpv iv.5 Psalms of the Brethren xxxvi.; J v.456. At A ii.22 it is said that a bhikkhu, however junior, may be called thera on account of his wisdom. It is added that four characteristics make a man a thera — high character, knowing the essential doctrines by heart, practising the four Jhānas, and being conscious of having attained freedom through the destruction of the mental intoxications. It is already clear that at a very early date, before the Anguttara reached its extant shape, a secondary meaning of thera was tending to supplant that of senior — that is, not the senior of the whole Order, but the senior of such a part of the Sangha as live in the same locality, or are carrying out the same function. — Note. thera in thero vassiko at S iv.161 is to be read tero — vassiko.
— gāthā hymns of senior bhikkhus, N. of a canonical book, incorporated in the Khuddaka — Nikāya. Theratara, very senior, oppd to navatara, novice D ii.154. — vāda the doctrine of the Theras, the original Buddhist doctrine M i.164; Dpvs iv.6, 13.

Theri

Source: A.P. Buddhadatta Mahathera, Concise Pali-English and English-Pali Dictionary [available as digital version from Metta Net, Sri Lanka]

Description:

therī : [f.] a senior nun; and old woman.

Elder Sister:

Source: A.P. Buddhadatta Mahathera, Concise Pali-English and English-Pali Dictionary [available as digital version from Metta Net, Sri Lanka]

Description: elder sister : (f.) jeṭṭhabhaginī.

和尚he shang – Buddhist monk (Bhikshu), Sanskrit: upadhyaya/Pali: upajjhaya

和尚尼 heshangni – Buddhist nun (Bhikshuni), Sanskrit: upadhyayani/Pali: upajjhayani (SAME as acaryani)

Posted in On the Path, Precepts Holders, Vinaya

Common Sangha Titles history part 1- use what we ask please

Monks and nuns from all Buddhist traditions have titles, we are taught to use them; all the lay people are taught to use them, nobody but stubborn people with no sense of offering respect would ever think of not addressing a monk or nun by their title or generic name.

Many ppl of this type go to great verbal links to try to justify this deliberate omission or statement of how respect is earned not given crap. means they got issues in life, however, it’s one thing in laity quite another in Sangha communities to try to pull this off is very extremely rude and would upset anyone in earshot.  It’s a clear verbal and written in disrespect of the Buddha, the Dharma, and the Sangha; the Triple Jewel to ignore Buddha’s teaching on this!  So here is the common words and their defined meanings for a start to clarify word meaning.

THERAVADA

Ajahn – couldn’t find it in the pali or sanskrit dictionaries, looked it up in buddhistdoor glossary which listed variant spellings, thank you Buddhistdoor!

ajahn derives from term acariya meaning teacher; acarya is sanskrit spelling for the same meaning. Thai spellings vary:  ajaan , ajarn , acharn and achaan; a meditation teacher, a teacher.

2. Ācarin
: (page 96)

153, 213 in same meaning. — pp. āciṇṇa. — 2. to step upon,
pass through J v.153.

ĀcarinĀcarin (adj.– n.) [fr. ā + car] treaching, f. ācarinī a female teacher Vin iv.227 (in contrast to gaṇa & in
same sense as ācariya m. at Vin iv.130), 317 (id.).

ĀcariyaĀcariya [fr. ā + car] a teacher (almost syn. with


3. Ācariya
: (page 96)

f. ācarinī a female teacher Vin iv.227 (in contrast to gaṇa
& in same sense as ācariya m. at Vin iv.130), 317 (id.).

ĀcariyaĀcariya [fr. ā + car] a teacher (almost
syn. with upajjhāya) Vin i.60, 61, 119 (˚upajjhāya); ii.231; iv.130 (gaṇo vā
ācariyo a meeting of the bhikkhus or a single teacher, cp. f. ācarinī); D i.103,
116 (gaṇ˚) 238


4. Ācariya
: (page 96)

ĀcariyaĀcariya [fr. ā + car] a teacher (almost syn. with upajjhāya) Vin
i.60, 61, 119 (˚upajjhāya); ii.231; iv.130 (gaṇo vā ācariyo a meeting of the
bhikkhus or a single teacher, cp. f. ācarinī);
D i.103, 116 (gaṇ˚) 238 (sattamâcariyamahāyuga seventh age of great teachers);
iii.189 sq.; M iii.115; S i.68 (gaṇ˚), 177; iv.176 (yogg˚); A


5. Ācariya
: (page 96)

(= ācāra– samācāra– sikkhāpaka PvA 252); Miln 201, 262 (master
goldsmith?); Vism 99 sq.; KhA 12, 155; SnA 422; VvA 138. <-> For
contracted form of ācariya see ācera .   — kula the clan of the teacher A ii.112. — dhana a teacher’s fee S
i.177; A v.347. — pācariya teacher upon teacher, lit. “teacher &
teacher’s teacher” (see ā1 3b) D


6. Ācariya
: (page 96)

For contracted form of ācariya see ācera .   — kula the
clan of the teacher A ii.112. — dhana a teacher’s fee S i.177; A v.347. —
pācariya teacher upon teacher, lit.
“teacher & teacher’s teacher” (see ā1 3b) D i.94, 114, 115, 238; S iv.306,
308; DA i.286; SnA 452 (= ācariyo cɔeva


7. Ācariya
: (page 96)

form of ācariya see ācera .   — kula the clan of the
teacher A ii.112. — dhana a teacher’s fee S i.177; A v.347. — pācariya
teacher upon teacher, lit. “teacher &
teacher’s teacher” (see ā1 3b) D i.94, 114, 115, 238; S iv.306, 308; DA i.286;
SnA 452 (= ācariyo cɔeva ācariya–


8. Ācariya
: (page 96)

see ācera .   — kula the clan of the teacher A ii.112. —
dhana a teacher’s fee S i.177; A v.347. — pācariya teacher upon
teacher, lit. “teacher & teacher’s
teacher” (see ā1 3b) D i.94, 114, 115, 238; S iv.306, 308; DA i.286; SnA 452 (=
ācariyo cɔeva ācariya– ācariyo ca). —

Bhante

Bhadanta (Bhaddanta) : (page 498) uchigao Pali English dictionary

1] venerable, reverend. mostly in voc. as address “Sir, holy father” etc., to men of the Order. voc. sg. bhadante S i.216 (v. l. bhaddante); voc. pl. bhadantā DhA iii.414. — A contracted form of bhadante is bhante (q. v.). Note. In case of bhadanta being the corresp. of Sk. *bhavanta (for bhavān) we would suppose the change v>d and account for dd on grounds of pop. analogy after bhadda. See bhante. The pl. nom. from bhadantā is formed after bhadante, which was felt as a voc. of an a —

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13. Bhadanta (Bhaddanta) : (page 498)

pl. bhadantā DhA iii.414. — A contracted form of bhadante is bhante (q. v.). Note. In case of bhadanta being the corresp. of Sk. *bhavanta (for bhavān) we would suppose the change v>d and account for dd on grounds of pop. analogy after bhadda. See bhante. The pl. nom. from bhadantā is formed after bhadante, which was felt as a voc. of an a — stem with — e for — a as in Prk. Māgadhī.

Bhadantika
Bhadantika (adj.) (– ˚) [fr. bhadanta] only in cpd.